January 17th, 2013

The Library Gets Pinteresting

pinterest-iconJust when you thought the library couldn’t get any cooler, we’re now on Pinterest!

What is Pinterest, you say? Simply, Pinterest is an online scrapbook of your favorite things. As you click-click-click your way around the internet, you find stuff you want to remember: books you want to read, DIY projects you want to try, places you want to travel to, quotes that inspire you, images that make you laugh, recipes you want to cook, fashions you wish you could pull off…   Pinterest makes remembering websites a visually exciting experience, using only images and small bits of text that link back to their original source.

Now you can see your library’s favorite things! (Note: You do not have to be a Pinterest user to benefit from the library’s account.)

We’re just revving our engines now, so please give us your feedback. If you check us out today, you’ll find themed book lists for adults and kids, some homeschooling ideas, and staff book recommendations. See a book you like? Click its picture to place a hold (you’ll be routed to our website). How easy is that? And for our patrons who love to pin, you can pin great books, audiobooks, DVDs and other materials straight from our site!

You’ll also see an exciting board highlighting our upcoming program, Tackling Paper Clutter. You’ll find ideas on purging, organizing, and systematizing. You’ll see organization books available at the library, compelling infographics, and instructions on how to find FREE magazine articles about managing paper clutter.

Stay tuned for more exciting stuff on our Pinterest page! We’ll be adding more homeschooling resources, as well as information on jobs and small businesses, and more.

What would you like to see on our Pinterest page? How do you use Pinterest?

CCPL pinterest screenshot


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October 24th, 2012

Lawn Chair Larry, Mach Man, and the Queen of the Mist

File:Annie Taylor.jpgWhen I heard that a man would free-fall from the edge of outer space in order to break the sound barrier, my first reaction was that we had another Lawn Chair Larry on our hands.  “Lawn Chair Larry” Walters was a Californian who strapped 45 weather balloons to his patio lounger, dubbed it Inspiration I, and attempted to fly 30 feet above his home. Once he reached 16,000 feet, I think he was mighty thankful for that Miller Lite and sandwiches he prepared for his leisure cruise. Now, I’m not a scientist, but even I can see that his landing strategy – shooting the balloons with a pellet gun – was a bad one. Fortunately for him, he didn’t quite meet the qualifications for the Darwin Awards, though their “At-Risk Survivor” salute guarantees that his injudicious innovation will remain in public memory.

But no, Felix Baumgartner – who I affectionately refer to as “Mach Man” – was no Lawn Chair Larry. Every angle and precaution was taken when he took the plunge from a helium balloon just two Sundays ago. Diving 23 miles and reaching 833.9 mph, he made history: the first man to create a sonic boom without being inside an aircraft. If you missed the live video feed on the internet, check out YouTube for a replay. It’s mind blowing.

Today marks the 111th anniversary of another bold dive. A 63-year-old named Annie Edson Taylor made a name for herself – “The Queen of the Mist” – when she decided to improve her station in life with a feat of daring. Annie plunged down Niagara Falls in a corked, 160-pound barrel and lived to tell the tale, though the achievement arguably gave her a bigger headache than bank account.

Have you checked out the Publisher’s Weekly Nonfiction Bestsellers List recently? Guinness World Records is #6! Flipping through the 2012 edition, I learned that a person will spend 23,973 hours during their lifetime reading newspapers, books, and comic books. That’s almost 1,000 days! I don’t know – with all of the people I see on a day-to-day basis, I suspect that our library patrons far exceed that amount!

Do you have any special talents that could get you into the record books?

How many hours do you think you’ve spent reading?