March 16th, 2015

Help Us Put CCPL in the National Spotlight on March 18

Social Media Idea 1

On February 24, we were thrilled to announce Cecil County Public Library’s selection as a finalist for the National Medal, our country’s highest honor presented to libraries that are making a profound positive difference in their communities.

For the 21st year, The Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) reviewed applications received from museums and libraries nationwide and narrowed the field of finalists to 15 libraries and 15 museums.

The mission of IMLS “to inspire libraries and museums to advance innovation, lifelong learning, and cultural and civic engagement” is similar to CCPL’s “to provide access to educational and cultural resources for all and to promote individual and community success.”

As quoted in the Cecil Whig, our Director Denise Davis said, “We have a philosophy to step-up to the issues here in the county,” including the teen drop-out rate, veteran employment and economic development. “We see these and we say, ‘Let’s look at what we can do,’” she said, adding, “That’s exactly the kind of thing IMLS looks for.”

In the time between the announcement of the 30 finalists and the announcement of the 10 winners on April 21, IMLS is highlighting museum and library finalists on their Facebook page. It’s a national platform for the public to both learn about different institutions around the country as well as to share testimonials about their hometown libraries or museums.

On Wednesday, March 18, it’s CCPL’s turn on the IMLS Facebook page. We encourage our patrons and friends to share how CCPL has made an exceptionally positive impact in our community. Not on Facebook? That’s okay – send us an email or talk to your local librarian.

Cecil County Public Library’s success is due to our dedicated staff as well as the support of our citizens and elected officials. Congratulations Cecil County, let’s celebrate this national recognition!

On February 24, we were thrilled to announce Cecil County Public Library’s selection as a finalist for the National Medal, our county’s highest honor presented to libraries that are making a profound positive difference in their communities.

For the 21st year, The Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) reviewed applications received from museums and libraries nationwide and narrowed the field of finalists to 15 libraries and 15 museums.

The mission of IMLS “to inspire libraries and museums to advance innovation, lifelong learning, and cultural and civic engagement” is similar to CCPL’s “to provide access to educational and cultural resources for all and to promote individual and community success.”

As quoted in the Cecil Whig, our Director Denise Davis said, “We have a philosophy to step-up to the issues here in the county,” including the teen drop-out rate, veteran employment and economic development. “We see these and we say, ‘Let’s look at what we can do,’” she said, adding, “That’s exactly the kind of thing IMLS looks for.”

In the time between the announcement of the 30 finalists and the announcement of the 10 winners on April 21, IMLS is highlighting museum and library finalists on their Facebook page. It’s a national platform for the public to both learn about different institutions around the county as well as to share testimonials about their hometown libraries or museums.

On Wednesday, March 18, it’s CCPL’s turn on the IMLS Facebook page. We encourage our patrons and friends to share how CCPL has made an exceptionally positive impact in our community. Not on Facebook? That’s okay – send us an email (jessa – you can use my email instead of webmaster) or talk to your local librarian.

Cecil County Public Library’s success is due to our dedicated staff as well as the support of our citizens and elected officials. Congratulations Cecil County, let’s celebrate this national recognition!



March 9th, 2015

Think Spring – What’s all the Buzz About?

vegetable-621782_640Last summer a friend gave me a delicious tomato from her garden that was a gorgeous metallic green color with red stripes. When I went to the grocery store, however, I couldn’t find the flavorful varieties with unique names like the one my friend gave me.

We’re deep into cold weather but I have spring on my mind, so I used the resources at my library to do a little research. Did you know that in addition to books and magazines about gardening and horticulture, CCPL has online resources on their website both an “Agriculture Collection” as well as “Gardening, Landscape and Horticulture”? I had access to hundreds of publications! I learned that most grocery store tomatoes, especially during cold months, are shipped in trucks from California and Florida. Definitely not local or home-grown!

Curious, I did a little more research and learned that heirloom tomatoes are open-pollinated (natural pollination, via insects or wind) and their seeds reproduce true to the plant they came from. I also learned that there is an overwhelming variety of heirloom tomatoes to choose from.

After a little more reading about available heirloom varieties, I plan to choose a few to plant this year.  I’m also interested in using more local produce than what I find at the grocery store. In addition to checking out a bunch of cookbooks to get ideas, I plan to attend “Eating Local: Community Supported Agriculture” on March 12 at the Rising Sun Branch, where I’ll get to chat with local farmers.

I’ve encouraged my gardening friends to attend the “Homesteading 101” program at the Chesapeake City Branch Library on March 23, led by Shane Brill, an urban homesteader. Mr. Brill will discuss raising bees and chickens and how to preserve fruits and vegetables.

The weather outside may be frightful, but the tomatoes I plan to grow I’m sure will be delightful!

Last summer a friend gave me a delicious tomato from her garden that was a gorgeous metallic green color with red stripes. When I went to the grocery store, however, I couldn’t find the flavorful varieties with unique names like the one my friend gave me.

We’re deep into cold weather but I have spring on my mind, so I used the resources at my library to do a little research. Did you know that in addition to books and magazines about gardening and horticulture, CCPL has online resources on their website both an “Agriculture Collection” as well as “Gardening, Landscape and Horticulture?” I had access to hundreds of publications! I learned that most grocery store tomatoes, especially during cold months, are shipped in trucks from California and Florida. Definitely not local or home-grown!

Curious, I did a little more research and learned that heirloom tomatoes are open-pollinated (natural pollination, via insects or wind) and their seeds reproduce true to the plant they came from. I also learned that there is an overwhelming variety of heirloom tomatoes to choose from.

After a little more reading about available heirloom varieties, I plan to choose a few to plant this year. I’m also interested in using more local produce than what I find at the grocery store. In addition to checking out a bunch of cookbooks to get ideas, I plan to attend “Eating Local: Community Supported Agriculture” on March 12 at the Rising Sun Branch, where I’ll get to chat with local farmers.

I’ve encouraged my gardening friends to attend the “Homesteading 101” program at the Chesapeake City Branch Library on March 23, led by Shane Brill, an urban homesteader. Mr. Brill will discuss raising bees and chickens and how to preserve fruits and vegetables.

The weather outside may be frightful, but the tomatoes I plan to grow I’m sure will be delightful!

What kind of garden are you planning?


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