April 13th, 2015

National Library Week

pew-infographic

It’s National Library Week – a time to celebrate your local library. Did you know that there are 123,000 public libraries in the United States? Have you ever wondered, what do Americans really think about public libraries?

A recent study by the Pew Research Center* found that 94% of Americans believe public libraries improve the quality of life in a community. 81% say libraries provide valuable services that people would struggle to find elsewhere. An economic impact study by the Free Library of Philadelphia revealed that in Philadelphia, homes within ¼ mile of a Library are worth, on average, $9,630 more than homes more than ¼ mile from a Library.

The Pew study also found that 95% of Americans believe library materials and resources play an important role in giving everyone a chance to succeed. These opinions match directly with Cecil County Public Library’s mission, which is to provide opportunity for all for individual and community success. How do we implement our mission? By knowing our community needs to make critical differences in education, workforce, and economic development.

Your award-winning library has been recognized at the local and state level, and recently by the Institute for Museum and Library Services for the second year as a National Medal finalist.

The Pew study’s national focus is reflected at our local level. Did you know that over 62,000 people use Cecil County Public Library cards? In a county of Cecil County’s size – approximately 100,000 – that’s impressive!

We encourage our many cardholders to find a friend who isn’t a library user and introduce them to our services, our staff and the fastest free broadband connections in the county. Why not visit a new branch, test out a new digital service or try a different genre of reading? Get your child or grandchild a library card and open the door to imagination, exploration and the pathway to success. Always dreamed of starting your own business? Contact our Small Business Information Center at sbic@ccplnet.org

Of course, you don’t have to be a cardholder. Our libraries are always open to all. Have a question? Ask our professional and courteous librarians. Meet a friend and have coffee in one of our cafes, attend a storytime with your child or a program on starting a business. Connect to the library’s wifi.

Whether you are a cardholder or not, we hope you’ll join the celebration of National Library Week.

How will you celebrate your library?

librarycard

*Pew Research Center is a nonpartisan fact tank that informs the public about the issues, attitudes and trends shaping America and the world.

It’s National Library Week – a time to celebrate your local library. Did you know that there are 123,000 public libraries in the United States? Have you ever wondered, what do Americans really think about public libraries?

A recent study by the Pew Research Center* found that 94% of Americans believe public libraries improve the quality of life in a community. 81% say libraries provide valuable services that people would struggle to find elsewhere. An economic impact study by the Free Library of Philadelphia revealed that in Philadelphia, homes within ¼ mile of a Library are worth, on average, $9,630 more than homes more than ¼ mile from a Library.

The Pew study also found that 95% of Americans believe library materials and resources play an important role in giving everyone a chance to succeed. These opinions match directly with Cecil County Public Library’s mission, which is to provide opportunity for all for individual and community success. How do we implement our mission? By knowing our community needs to make critical differences in education, workforce, and economic development.

Your award-winning library has been recognized at the local and state level, and recently by the Institute for Museum and Library Services for the second year as a National Medal finalist.

The Pew study’s national focus is reflected at our local level. Did you know that over 62,000 people use Cecil County Public Library cards? In a county of Cecil County’s size – approximately 100,000 – that’s impressive!

We encourage our many cardholders to find a friend who isn’t a library user and introduce them to our services, our staff and the fastest free broadband connections in the county. Why not visit a new branch, test out a new digital service or try a different genre of reading? Get your child or grandchild a library card and open the door to imagination, exploration and the pathway to success. Always dreamed of starting your own business? Contact our Small Business Information Center at sbic@ccplnet.org

Of course, you don’t have to be a cardholder. Our libraries are always open to all. Have a question? Ask our professional and courteous librarians. Meet a friend and have coffee in one of our cafes, attend a storytime with your child or a program on starting a business. Connect to the library’s wifi.

Whether you are a cardholder or not, we hope you’ll join the celebration of National Library Week.

How will you celebrate your library?


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March 9th, 2015

Think Spring – What’s all the Buzz About?

vegetable-621782_640Last summer a friend gave me a delicious tomato from her garden that was a gorgeous metallic green color with red stripes. When I went to the grocery store, however, I couldn’t find the flavorful varieties with unique names like the one my friend gave me.

We’re deep into cold weather but I have spring on my mind, so I used the resources at my library to do a little research. Did you know that in addition to books and magazines about gardening and horticulture, CCPL has online resources on their website both an “Agriculture Collection” as well as “Gardening, Landscape and Horticulture”? I had access to hundreds of publications! I learned that most grocery store tomatoes, especially during cold months, are shipped in trucks from California and Florida. Definitely not local or home-grown!

Curious, I did a little more research and learned that heirloom tomatoes are open-pollinated (natural pollination, via insects or wind) and their seeds reproduce true to the plant they came from. I also learned that there is an overwhelming variety of heirloom tomatoes to choose from.

After a little more reading about available heirloom varieties, I plan to choose a few to plant this year.  I’m also interested in using more local produce than what I find at the grocery store. In addition to checking out a bunch of cookbooks to get ideas, I plan to attend “Eating Local: Community Supported Agriculture” on March 12 at the Rising Sun Branch, where I’ll get to chat with local farmers.

I’ve encouraged my gardening friends to attend the “Homesteading 101” program at the Chesapeake City Branch Library on March 23, led by Shane Brill, an urban homesteader. Mr. Brill will discuss raising bees and chickens and how to preserve fruits and vegetables.

The weather outside may be frightful, but the tomatoes I plan to grow I’m sure will be delightful!

Last summer a friend gave me a delicious tomato from her garden that was a gorgeous metallic green color with red stripes. When I went to the grocery store, however, I couldn’t find the flavorful varieties with unique names like the one my friend gave me.

We’re deep into cold weather but I have spring on my mind, so I used the resources at my library to do a little research. Did you know that in addition to books and magazines about gardening and horticulture, CCPL has online resources on their website both an “Agriculture Collection” as well as “Gardening, Landscape and Horticulture?” I had access to hundreds of publications! I learned that most grocery store tomatoes, especially during cold months, are shipped in trucks from California and Florida. Definitely not local or home-grown!

Curious, I did a little more research and learned that heirloom tomatoes are open-pollinated (natural pollination, via insects or wind) and their seeds reproduce true to the plant they came from. I also learned that there is an overwhelming variety of heirloom tomatoes to choose from.

After a little more reading about available heirloom varieties, I plan to choose a few to plant this year. I’m also interested in using more local produce than what I find at the grocery store. In addition to checking out a bunch of cookbooks to get ideas, I plan to attend “Eating Local: Community Supported Agriculture” on March 12 at the Rising Sun Branch, where I’ll get to chat with local farmers.

I’ve encouraged my gardening friends to attend the “Homesteading 101” program at the Chesapeake City Branch Library on March 23, led by Shane Brill, an urban homesteader. Mr. Brill will discuss raising bees and chickens and how to preserve fruits and vegetables.

The weather outside may be frightful, but the tomatoes I plan to grow I’m sure will be delightful!

What kind of garden are you planning?


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