April 18th, 2016

SAT Resources

SAT prep booksAfter seeing my son’s PSAT scores, I realize he needs to do some studying before taking the SAT in the fall. I knew the library had traditional study guides in paper form, but I was surprised and excited by the depth of digital options now available.

With your library card already (if you don’t have one it’s free for Maryland residents), fire up the laptop or tablet right now and access our online practice tests. With a choice of two different products (Learning Express Library and Testing and Education Reference Center), try both to see which fits your student’s learning style best. Once you have created a login, choose to take part of the practice test or power through from math to reading. Full text study guides are also available as part of these products if things just aren’t going well.

With months to go before the fall SAT, sign up for a free SAT/ACT Prep Course from Gale Courses. This two part, instructor led online course provides lessons, interaction and content quizzes and would be perfect to keep skills fresh over summer break. Maybe while you are there, check out out all the career introduction courses on offer, if you are still undecided about a direction after high school.

Then, once you ace the SAT, come back and explore the college and scholarship information the library offers to take your next step. With so many free options, we hope all students can find the help they need to take their first steps toward achieving college and a successful career.

Late registration for the May 7 test closes April 26. For the June 4 test, regular registration ends May 5 and late registration closes May 25. Fall test dates have not yet been announced.

Where’s your favorite place to study?


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January 5th, 2016

Gateway to Freedom

UndergroundRRI enjoy learning about American history and have recently been reading about the Underground railroad, going beyond traditional Harriet Tubman tales.

In “Gateway to Freedom,” Pulitzer-Prize winning scholar, Eric Foner delves into American slavery and freedom, focusing on New York City, where slavery continued even after it was abolished. New York also had the largest free black community, where slave-catchers trolled, often selling free children into slavery in the south. Abolitionists and free blacks formed the New York Vigilance Committee in 1835 and by the 1840s was a thriving network which became known as the underground railroad.
Using the formerly secret records of Sydney Howard Gay, Foner develops an inspiring chronicle, introducing characters formerly unknown to the history books. This 2015 book is also available for immediate download via Hoopla, which provides free movies, music, television, and audiobooks.
Looking for more Underground Railroad stories? Check out the DVD “Underground Railroad: the William Still Story,” a compelling tale of William Still, one of the most unheralded individuals of the Underground Railroad. There’s also a book of journals published by William Still called “The Underground Railroad: Authentic Narratives and First-Hand Accounts.”
If you’re interested in local history about the Underground Railroad, visit the Chesapeake City Branch, Monday, January 11 at 6:30 PM when Historian Milt Diggins explores the Underground Railroad through the Baltimore-Wilmington-Philadelphia corridor and how the Chesapeake and Delaware Canal played an important part of this history. Or he will present Regional Tales of the Underground Railroad at the Perryville Branch, Wednesday, February 17 at 7 PM.
What do you know about the Underground Railroad?


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