January 5th, 2016

Gateway to Freedom

UndergroundRRI enjoy learning about American history and have recently been reading about the Underground railroad, going beyond traditional Harriet Tubman tales.

In “Gateway to Freedom,” Pulitzer-Prize winning scholar, Eric Foner delves into American slavery and freedom, focusing on New York City, where slavery continued even after it was abolished. New York also had the largest free black community, where slave-catchers trolled, often selling free children into slavery in the south. Abolitionists and free blacks formed the New York Vigilance Committee in 1835 and by the 1840s was a thriving network which became known as the underground railroad.
Using the formerly secret records of Sydney Howard Gay, Foner develops an inspiring chronicle, introducing characters formerly unknown to the history books. This 2015 book is also available for immediate download via Hoopla, which provides free movies, music, television, and audiobooks.
Looking for more Underground Railroad stories? Check out the DVD “Underground Railroad: the William Still Story,” a compelling tale of William Still, one of the most unheralded individuals of the Underground Railroad. There’s also a book of journals published by William Still called “The Underground Railroad: Authentic Narratives and First-Hand Accounts.”
If you’re interested in local history about the Underground Railroad, visit the Chesapeake City Branch, Monday, January 11 at 6:30 PM when Historian Milt Diggins explores the Underground Railroad through the Baltimore-Wilmington-Philadelphia corridor and how the Chesapeake and Delaware Canal played an important part of this history. Or he will present Regional Tales of the Underground Railroad at the Perryville Branch, Wednesday, February 17 at 7 PM.
What do you know about the Underground Railroad?


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April 27th, 2015

CCPL’s Digital Services

android-logged-in-account

Recently, I was browsing the magazines at the Elkton Central Library, and a magazine cover advertising “quick weeknight dinners” caught my eye. I was all set to check it out when I saw the red star on the cover, indicating that it was the current issue and needed to stay in the branch for others to view. Fortunately, I was able to check it out using Zinio, which provides access to full magazine issues through CCPL’s website. You can check out as many as you want, and there are no late fees.

Now, you only need one account to access the magazines. Just create an account using your library card number – the link is at the top right of the screen – and you can be reading a magazine right away. We have magazines for everybody: cooking, gardening, science, sports, crafts, and travel.

If you want to read on the go, you can use the new Zinio for Libraries app (available for iPad and Android). For other devices, the commercial Zinio app, which requires two accounts , is available.

Of course, you can do more than read magazines on the go. Check out our devices and downloads page for links to Hoopla (movies, TV shows, audiobooks, and music), OverDrive (ebooks and audiobooks), OneClickDigital (audiobooks), and BookMyne (Android version shown above), which allows easy access to the CCPL library catalog and lets you place holds, renew items, or just see what you have checked out, all from your smartphone or tablet.

If all this sounds a little overwhelming, don’t despair. You can get one-on-one help with your smartphones, e-readers, or tablets at our Smart Device Helper program at the North East Branch Library at 1 PM on Wednesday, April 29 and Wednesday, May 27. Register by clicking the dates or by calling 410-996-6269. If you can’t make those dates, try Is This Thing On: A Friendly Guide to Everything Digital for Newbies, Technophobes, and the Kicking & Screaming, or try asking a librarian for help.

How many CCPL digital services have you tried?


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