February 22nd, 2016

Local Author David Teague to Visit

Henry Cicada's Extraordinary Elktonium Escapade by David TeagueIf you have children in elementary or middle school, especially those who are aspiring writers, we have a program that you don’t want to miss. Join us at the Elkton Central Library on February 25th at 4:00 p.m. to meet local author David Teague.

David Teague is the author of several children’s and middle grade books. After finding a niche in storytelling with his kids at bedtime, David began his career by writing picture books. David’s first book, Franklin’s Big Dreams, features a boy named Franklin who cannot sleep. Why, you ask? Because night after night, a construction crew enters his bedroom and starts building railroads, canals, and runways. In an interview about his book, David admits that his idea stemmed from a recurring dream he had as a child. While attempting to fall asleep, David often heard the rumbling of the trains from his bedroom. However, while David’s dreams never led him to the end of the tracks, he wanted to give Franklin the chance to investigate the mystery and follow the path out of his bedroom.

After the success of his first book, David published a second picture book, The Red Hat. He then decided to collaborate with his wife, Marisa de los Santos, on his next two novels. Marisa is the author of several adult books including Belong to Me and The Precious One. What happens when you mix together an adult novelist and a picture book writer? You get middle grade books. David and Marisa’s first collaborative effort was Saving Lucas Biggs, which features a mix of historical fiction and time travel. The novel received critical acclaim and is a Texas Bluebonnet Award nominee for 2015-2016. The couple then paired on Connect the Stars, which was published in September of 2015. When asked about how this collaboration works, David and Marisa note that planning is key. For Saving Lucas Biggs, for example, David wrote the chapters told from the perspective of a 13-year-old boy, and Marisa wrote the chapters told by a 13-year-old girl. This partnership succeeded in producing two books for middle grade readers that are heartwarming, beautifully written, and feature quirky characters that cannot help but make readers laugh.

On January 19th, 2016, just in time for his visit to our library, David Teague released his newest novel, Henry Cicada’s Extraordinary Elktonium Escapade. This is David’s first solo middle grade book, and it has already received 4.2 out of 5 stars on Goodreads from readers of advanced copies. Henry Cicada is a wacky adventure novel that features a tween, Henry, whose mother invented a luminescent green metal called Elktonium. After a run-in with this metal, Henry discovers a telepathic connection to a girl named Lulu. While this sounds exciting enough on its own, Henry soon learns that Lulu is in trouble, and Henry is the only one who can help her.

By the way, did you notice anything about David’s title? The curious metal, Elktonium, is named after our very own town of Elkton! David spent time in Elkton as a child and references our great town in his newest book.

Want to know more about David? He currently lives in Wilmington, DE with his wife, Marisa, his two teens, Charles and Annabel, and their two Yorkies, Huxley and Finn. David plays the violin, loves The Dark is Rising by Susan Cooper, and teaches literature at the University of Delaware.

To register for this free program, please click here or call 410-996-5600 ext. 481.


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February 1st, 2016

Visions of the Universe

cats-eye-nebula-1098160_1280Galileo Galilei transformed our knowledge of the universe in 1609 when he peered into the cosmos using an telescope—the first person to do so. An exciting exhibit, which opens the week of February 1st at Cecil County Public Library, celebrates the story of how astronomy has evolved over the four hundred years since then.

“Visions of the Universe: Four Centuries of Discovery” uses historical drawings and diagrams made by Galileo and other early astronomers, along with dramatic contemporary images taken by the Hubble Space Telescope and other space missions, to show how our views and understanding of the universe and the objects within it have changed over the centuries. The 12-paneled exhibit will be on display at the Perryville Branch, Chesapeake City Branch and Elkton Central Library through March.

Space exploration has fascinated Americans, especially in the 20th century, from Chuck Yeager breaking the sound barrier in 1947 to the space race and Apollo 11’s 1969 moon landing and from the development, then retirement of the Space Shuttle, to NASA’s current call for a new class of astronauts. Movies and books have also encouraged our love of space, whether fact or fiction, from Gravity to Star Wars and from “Neil Armstrong: a Life of Flight” to “The Martian.”

The “Visions of the Universe” exhibit will engage our community in a discussion of what’s really in the night sky, our understanding of it past and present, and the possibilities of future exploration. This exhibit and related programs are an opportunity to remind parents and ignite the imaginations of children and teens about the many career possibilities in STEM industries –right here in Cecil County and throughout Maryland. With the right education and experiences students can embark on career-paths in a wide variety of fields such as: aeronautical (Orbital ATK), defense (Aberdeen Proving Ground, US Naval Academy), Physics (Johns Hopkins Applied Physics lab), medicine (Shock Trauma) and research (University of Maryland) – just to name a few.

CCPL will offer space-themed events for all ages on a variety of topics for children, teens and adults, such as “Astronaut Academy,” “Constellation Hunting” and “Meet an Astronaut.” For more information or to sign-up pick up a brochure at any Cecil County Public Library branch or visit www.cecil.ebranch.info.

“Visions of the Universe” is presented by the Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, Maryland; the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, Cambridge, Massachusetts; and the American Library Association, Chicago, through funding from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA).

What’s your favorite space book or movie?


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