December 14th, 2015

Recommendations, Resources & Gift Guides For All Ages!

for-reading-813666_640Are you looking for the next great book for your child or grandchild? Check out these resources!

Your Librarians

Our professional and skilled librarians are always available to answer questions and connect you with a variety of authors, books and themes—for yourself—or your children. Can’t make it to the library in person? Call any branch or email: ask@ccplnet.org

CCPL’s Great Reads

Have you visited the “Great Reads” section of our website? It has themed lists, staff recommendations as well as all the newest award-winners and best-sellers.

CCPL’s Bookmate

Still looking for that perfect book when you have —or your loved one has — “read everything?” Try Bookmate— the free book and author matching service is for all ages and interests. Fill out a simple survey and return it to your local branch—trained librarians will make 3 recommendations.

A Mighty Girl

The world’s largest collection of books, toys and movies for smart, confident, and courageous girls. Choose from a variety of topics such as building, top holiday picks as well as by age group.

Guys Read

A web-based literacy program for boys founded by author and First National Ambassador of Young People’s Literature Jon Scieszka. The  mission is to help boys be self–motivated, lifelong readers. Look for reading ideas, booklists, and research based on encouraging guys to read.

Common Sense Media

This website rates, educates, and advocates for kids, families, and schools—with ratings by what both kids and parents have to say. Their gift guide is packed with 100+ holiday gift ideas hand-selected to inspire, educate, and entertain kids of all ages and stages. Whether your list includes young children, tweens, or teens, use this guide to find presents that kids and parents will feel good about.

What’s your favorite way to recommend a good read?

 


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October 5th, 2015

Orphan Trains

child on trainI would guess that many of you, like me, had never heard of the orphan trains until the publication of Orphan Train by Christina Baker Kline. Since its publication in 2013 it has been a surprise hit and a book club favorite. It tells a story about a little-known but important part of American history: the Orphan Train Movement.

Founded in 1853 in New York City, the Children’s Aid Society committed itself to the “placing out” of children from the slums of New York City to rural America. Between 1854 and 1930, 150,000 children would ride the so-called orphan trains. The goal was to move destitute children from New York City and other large East coast cities, to the Midwest where it was thought they would enjoy a better way of life. The children boarded the trains carrying all of their possessions in a cardboard suitcase. At each stop the children would disembark where interested citizens would make their choices. If a child was not chosen they were sent on to the next town. Despite the Society’s best efforts, some children suffered. Though they tried to keep siblings together, often brothers and sisters would be separated. Some felt abandoned and lonely and were viewed by their adoptive families and communities as outsiders. In the worst cases they were treated as slave labor and physically abused. But for many it was a blessing and they were adopted by loving families.

On Wednesday, October 14 at 7:00 p.m., award-winning author and member of the National Orphan Train Historical Society, Donna Aviles, will speak at the Perryville Branch Library. As the granddaughter of an orphan train rider, Ms. Aviles has a very personal connection to its history. The presentation will include a discussion of the Orphan Train Movement and a recording of the reminiscences of an Orphan Train rider as he recalls his experience travelling from a New York orphanage to Kansas.

Will you join us on October 14?


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