July 20th, 2015

Heroes

everyday-heroes-signWith this year’s Summer Reading theme of “Every Hero Has a Story,” we will take time to reflect on what a hero is. The concept of a hero is an ever-changing one in our society. For small children, the only reference point of hero is what they see on television and in video games such as Spiderman and Batman. For elderly adults, it may be the person who takes them to the store or spends time with them.

Teenagers, however, may find it harder to identify a hero as they are in the middle-ground between childhood and adulthood. There are many gray areas— what can you do, what can’t you do, what do you believe in, what don’t you believe in, who are your friends, where do you belong—so many questions! All of these uncertainties make it difficult to define a hero.

Teenagers lose their sense of awe in the extraordinary. They may find it hard to suspend reality and view their childhood “heroes” in that capacity any longer. In addition, they are too cool to think of a parent or community helper, such as a police officer, as a hero. Often, teens will look at other outside sources for motivation and hero-worship. You may ask your teen who their hero is and often be answered with the latest music artist or sports personality. In some respects, this may be a viable hero. In others, maybe not so much!

As we take time to reflect on what a hero is to each of us, we note that heroes can take on many different shapes, sizes, and incarnations. Children, teens, and adults can find plenty of inspiration at the library. We have books, movies, and programs that provide access to traditional “super” heroes as well as other non-traditional heroes such as animal search and rescue heroes, military heroes, and everyday heroes who have overcome extreme obstacles.

Perryville Branch Library is hosting a teen program on Thursday, July 23rd at 3 PM called “Heroes Among Us”. Teens will be asked what the word “hero” means to them and challenged to identify a hero of their own. Teens will participate in games and activities to explore heroism and discuss ways that real-life heroes differ from heroes we see in books, movies, and comics.

So think about it….who is YOUR everyday hero?


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June 15th, 2015

Taking our online test for a spin

car-522411_1280My driver’s license was earned when Red Toad was tree lined and spooky, drag racing was still possible past Craigtown and my 11 year old brother would drive a tractor to school if he missed the bus.  Back then, driver’s ed was offered to all 10th graders as a regular class, and I can only guess, forced on the teacher who drew the short straw.  As most of us had been driving something since our feet could touch the pedals, the class tended to drift away from traffic rules to the best way of jacking up your Bronco. Now with a 15 year old who thinks tailgating happens only in parking lots, it’s time for a reality check—for both of us.

And what an eye opener the MVA Practice Tests proved to be.  As the older, experienced driver, I attempted the free, online permit practice test first.  The 40 question, multiple choice test provided immediate feedback on my questionable answers.  In my defense, for questions such as the distance in feet you must keep between your car and a stopped school bus, “a bunch” was not a choice.  My son kindly pointed out I could access the Maryland Drivers Handbook right from the site if I wanted to study before retaking the test.  Failure in our house is not an option.

CCPL’s Driving-Tests.Org also has practice for CDL and motorcycle tests. For even more practice in both English and Spanish, you can go to the Maryland MVA’s online driver test tutorial. They even have apps for Android and iOS!


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